Exhibition July 13 - Aug 1

Opening reception Fri 14 July

 

Gallery 1:  Soul Thoughts  by Carmel Sayer Carmel Sayer uses her artwork to explore the relationship between post modern global society and the diminishment of human spirituality. Through her work, Sayer explores the adverse effects on humanity and the soul, rising from the misuse of technology and a loss of connectivity with nature and one’s self within high density urban environments.  Carmel's latest works are focusing on ‘mapping’ the soul and how the fragmentation of thoughts leads to the decompartmentalization of the soul, due to her belief that spirituality is being institutionalized.  Spirituality is being institutionalized, fragmented, ruled and watered down by urban environment, religion and technology. By cutting ourselves off from nature, disconnecting through connecting, the spiritual force within us is broken down, weakened, and in turn our mental health suffers. This has far reaching effects on society as the chain of events repeats over and over, with each round diluting, separating and splintering the spirit.  In Carmel’s work, these forces come together, fragments loosely form, connect and unite in a colourful strength to combat and confront the very nature of ourselves.

Gallery 1:  Soul Thoughts

 by Carmel Sayer

Carmel Sayer uses her artwork to explore the relationship between post modern global society and the diminishment of human spirituality. Through her work, Sayer explores the adverse effects on humanity and the soul, rising from the misuse of technology and a loss of connectivity with nature and one’s self within high density urban environments. 

Carmel's latest works are focusing on ‘mapping’ the soul and how the fragmentation of thoughts leads to the decompartmentalization of the soul, due to her belief that spirituality is being institutionalized. 

Spirituality is being institutionalized, fragmented, ruled and watered down by urban environment, religion and technology. By cutting ourselves off from nature, disconnecting through connecting, the spiritual force within us is broken down, weakened, and in turn our mental health suffers. This has far reaching effects on society as the chain of events repeats over and over, with each round diluting, separating and splintering the spirit. 

In Carmel’s work, these forces come together, fragments loosely form, connect and unite in a colourful strength to combat and confront the very nature of ourselves.

Gallery 2: Something Fishy by Charles-Andre' Lemire This installation explores the paradoxal thematics of suspension and weight through two different mediums. On one side,  a moving image of a man falling from the sky but stuck in a limbo of repetition. Suspended in time and space,  his continuous fall (or ascent?) goes from a chaotic and disturbed event to a stabilized position, then back again.  On the other side and facing the video, a bench with a photo under a rock. As the movement floats in the air, the still image is prisoner. This eerie sight is hidden, blocked, under this punishment  left on a bench, grounded.  My work is about forms, shapes and their narratives. It's about material, about what we see and how we see it. It takes shape in loops, that can create a new narrative through repetition.  Our lives are made of these little repetitions that can be comforting, boring, disturbing.  I like to take a snap of this life, like an old biology sketch, where you can dissect with your eyes a moment of time.  

Gallery 2: Something Fishy

by Charles-Andre' Lemire

This installation explores the paradoxal thematics of suspension and weight through two different mediums. On one side, 

a moving image of a man falling from the sky but stuck in a limbo of repetition. Suspended in time and space, 

his continuous fall (or ascent?) goes from a chaotic and disturbed event to a stabilized position, then back again. 

On the other side and facing the video, a bench with a photo under a rock. As the movement floats in the air, the still image is prisoner. This eerie sight is hidden, blocked, under this punishment  left on a bench, grounded. 

My work is about forms, shapes and their narratives. It's about material, about what we see and how we see it. It takes shape in loops, that can create a new narrative through repetition. 

Our lives are made of these little repetitions that can be comforting, boring, disturbing. 

I like to take a snap of this life, like an old biology sketch,

where you can dissect with your eyes a moment of time.

 

Gallery 3: Everyday life by Selected Artists To be really great in little things, to be truly noble and heroic in the insipid details of everyday life, is a virtue so rare as to be worthy of canonization.  -  Harriet Beecher Stowe Artists  Aneta Bozic, Baden Johnson, Liz Millsom, Justine Millsom Lis Johnson, Ying Huang, Supansa Thongsuk, Fiona Martin Megan Tan, Kaitlyn francis and Tim Coleman  Credit image : Aneta Bozic  

Gallery 3: Everyday life

by Selected Artists

To be really great in little things, to be truly noble and heroic in the insipid details of everyday life, is a virtue so rare as to be worthy of canonization.  -  Harriet Beecher Stowe

Artists  Aneta Bozic, Baden Johnson, Liz Millsom, Justine Millsom

Lis Johnson, Ying Huang, Supansa Thongsuk, Fiona Martin

Megan Tan, Kaitlyn francis and Tim Coleman 

Credit image : Aneta Bozic