Exhibition April 20- May 6

Opening reception on Thursday 20 April

 
Gallery 1: Grid Meditation & Square Works by Wladyslaw Ratuszyinski and Leigh Hewitt In Wladyslaw Ratuszyinski's large charcoal works on paper shrouded chairs become monumental mountain ranges and everyday train station scenes become sites of transformation.  The treatment of the images sublimates the subject matter, illuminating the scenes with a divine light.  The inspiration for this series was the re-emergence of childhood dreams and the youthful imagination exercise of finding fanciful objects and scenes in the formations of clouds. The title of the series "Grid Meditation" refers to the artist's process, visible in the works, of using the age-old grid drawing method in conjunction with a meditative approach. The three tools used, the willow charcoal, the eraser, and the smudging tool, are given equal importance in this process. The works shown are selected from the larger series of "Grid Meditation" works. Shown alongside Wladyslaw's monochrome works are the often brightly coloured oil paintings of Leigh Hewitt.  These largely figurative works hint at narrative and metaphor but avoid blunt conclusions. When viewed together this collection of sometimes puzzling images may be seen in terms of duality -  the heroic mingles with the mundane, the real with the concocted, and the busy with the calm. Painting in oil on board, Leigh attempts to render with each work a unique snippet of the cartoonish world we inhabit and create, where folk singers peer at us through dying foliage, men in grey handle kaleidoscopic bunches of balloons, and man beats computer in a game of logic for the final time.  

Gallery 1: Grid Meditation & Square Works by Wladyslaw Ratuszyinski and Leigh Hewitt

In Wladyslaw Ratuszyinski's large charcoal works on paper shrouded chairs become monumental mountain ranges and everyday train station scenes become sites of transformation.  The treatment of the images sublimates the subject matter, illuminating the scenes with a divine light.  The inspiration for this series was the re-emergence of childhood dreams and the youthful imagination exercise of finding fanciful objects and scenes in the formations of clouds. The title of the series "Grid Meditation" refers to the artist's process, visible in the works, of using the age-old grid drawing method in conjunction with a meditative approach. The three tools used, the willow charcoal, the eraser, and the smudging tool, are given equal importance in this process. The works shown are selected from the larger series of "Grid Meditation" works.

Shown alongside Wladyslaw's monochrome works are the often brightly coloured oil paintings of Leigh Hewitt.  These largely figurative works hint at narrative and metaphor but avoid blunt conclusions. When viewed together this collection of sometimes puzzling images may be seen in terms of duality -  the heroic mingles with the mundane, the real with the concocted, and the busy with the calm. Painting in oil on board, Leigh attempts to render with each work a unique snippet of the cartoonish world we inhabit and create, where folk singers peer at us through dying foliage, men in grey handle kaleidoscopic bunches of balloons, and man beats computer in a game of logic for the final time.

 

Gallery 2 : Continuum of variation by David Freney-Mills David Freney-Mills explores the visual appearance of language through fragmenting and rearranging text in overlapping layers. Through his work David attempts to convey the realisations that occur when we read or hear words that resonate within, and the expansive effect that language can have when used in poetry or the reciting of mantras. David’s primary medium is ink on Mulberry paper. His process is inspired by traditional ink painting from the East Asian region, as well as the techniques of contemporary and traditional Japanese painting and dye art. David studied at Victorian College of the Arts and Fine Arts at RMIT. David continues to exhibit locally in solo and group exhibitions.  

Gallery 2 : Continuum of variation by David Freney-Mills

David Freney-Mills explores the visual appearance of language through fragmenting and rearranging text in overlapping layers. Through his work David attempts to convey the realisations that occur when we read or hear words that resonate within, and the expansive effect that language can have when used in poetry or the reciting of mantras.

David’s primary medium is ink on Mulberry paper. His process is inspired by traditional ink painting from the East Asian region, as well as the techniques of contemporary and traditional Japanese painting and dye art.

David studied at Victorian College of the Arts and Fine Arts at RMIT. David continues to exhibit locally in solo and group exhibitions.

 

Gallery 3 : Collision by Ryan F Kennedy A multi-disciplinary artist RFK’s work traverses sculpture / 3d and performance / installation. Using the clumsiness of words to convey personal/political messages grown into both object and experiential forms. RFK is returning to the Lorne Sculpture Biennale in 2018 after his successful participation in both performance and sculpture categories in 2016. Previous exhibitions of his work include White Night 2015, Fehily Contemporary, Stockroom Gallery. RFK works and lives in Hepburn Shire, Victoria where he continues to develop his practice.  “The moment of impact is neither exact nor abstract, yet in fact a moment of contact in both act and artefact”  

Gallery 3 : Collision by Ryan F Kennedy

A multi-disciplinary artist RFK’s work traverses sculpture / 3d and performance / installation. Using the clumsiness of words to convey personal/political messages grown into both object and experiential forms. RFK is returning to the Lorne Sculpture Biennale in 2018 after his successful participation in both performance and sculpture categories in 2016. Previous exhibitions of his work include White Night 2015, Fehily Contemporary, Stockroom Gallery. RFK works and lives in Hepburn Shire, Victoria where he continues to develop his practice. 

“The moment of impact is neither exact nor abstract, yet in fact a moment of contact in both act and artefact”