OPENING : Thursday 17 Oct at 6-8 pm.

EXHIBITION : Wed 16 Oct - Sun 27 Oct, 2019

SPACE 1: Group Show COLOURPLAY

LINDESAY DRESDON
My artwork celebrates the infinite ways in which ideas and materials can be transformed into vibrant, expressive visual statements. I’m particularly interested in the idea of ‘theme and variations’, where an image or motif is produced, dissected and rearranged into a new work. Sometimes the essence of the original is obvious, and sometime obscure.
The interplay of improvised gestures, surface textures, spatial composition, and a curious imagination are key elements in the production of my work. Working in a free abstract manner and contrasting with surface, substructure, colour and texture, I like to recycle and rework surfaces, as well as using previously abandoned works to create new ones.

BRYCE ASTON
This current body of work is a manipulation of previously discarded offcuts of new and older coloured paper. My focus with the cut paper is in sharp precision, contrasting effects and collision of colour, shape and texture, to create visual reverberation. In exploring this theme, the boards become increasingly energetic, vibrant and contrasting as shapes and angles are juxtaposed. In the second series, I have manipulated and generated a more random, less geometrical and chaotic outcome. The unpredictable nature of the tear removes the innate element of control of the previous cut work and shapes dictate the result.
These artworks can be viewed either individually or in contrasting multiple groups. I have manipulated these pieces so that they can be placed in either landscape or portrait positions.

THEA BATES
I have called this series Rhapsody. Like a rhapsody in music, each piece is a one-movement work that is episodic yet integrated, free-flowing in structure, featuring a range of highly contrasted moods, colour, and tonality. Like music there is an air of spontaneous inspiration and a sense of improvisation make it freer in form than a set of variations. Essentially an intuitive abstract artist, my visual language is organic and constantly evolving. I find inspiration for my art everywhere, on the street, at the breakfast table, in the bush or lurking in the shadows, usually as a response to the materials and tools at hand in a given moment. Mark making is central to my process. I love water-based ink pens and photographic paper, or handmade papers that drink the paint. Marks grow out of the background, lines take themselves on journeys of discovery, colour comes to play. I prefer to explore and experiment, to make things up and take creative risks whilst my knowledge of the elements of art and design is always there in the sub-conscious supporting my desire to make art that is personally satisfying.

SPACE 2: To Be Still
Nikki Willson

Our lives exist within a world of constant movement and distraction. We are in constant negotiation between the space that we occupy and our own internal dialogue. Both voices constantly vying for attention. There are moments however, precious moments when everything becomes still and quiet. Our voice stills and we pass through the time before and the time after in clarity and a true sense of presence. It is this sense of being outside of time that I am trying to capture in my work.

By manipulating the digital image I combine photography and painting to remove context and create narrative ambiguity. This ambiguity allows the moment to be clarified and requires the viewer to fill the narrative space surrounding it.

SPACE 3: Pulse
Alexandra Rosenblum


'Pulse' is a series of chemigram works in conjunction with a dialogue of recorded sound, representational of Wilyakahli land and its environmental changes since the mining industries inception.

This investigation began as a result of connecting the landscapes of the far west with alternative photographic processes. It observes how the landscape has changed as a result of industrial intervention and uses photographic chemistry to investigate and document these changes.

Pulse replicates these landscapes by utilising the very silver that was once removed from this earth. Photographic paper is light sensitive due to a chemical coating made with silver; the mineral responsible for Broken Hill’s industrial wealth. This methodology provides a path for the silver to be returned to the land and becomes a process in which to document the environment.


OPENING NIGHT & EXHIBITION